Killer robots

Rhotax First_VaultDweller
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Killer robots

Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 23 paź czw 2008, 1:32 pm

amerykanskie roboty znow odjebaly do cywilow



'US missiles' hit Pakistan school

A suspected US missile strike has killed at least eight students at a religious school in north-western Pakistan, witnesses say.

The school, in North Waziristan, is close to the residence of a fugitive Taleban leader, Jalaluddin Haqqani, witnesses told the BBC Urdu Service.

At least two missiles, reportedly fired by pilotless US drones, hit the school early on Thursday.

The Pakistani army is investigating the incident. The US has made no comment.

The attack comes hours after the Pakistani parliament unanimously adopted a resolution calling on the government to defend its sovereignty and expel foreign fighters from the region.

The resolution also called upon the government to prevent the use of Pakistani territory for attacks on another country.

There have been persistent US accusations that Pakistan is not doing enough to eliminate Taleban and al-Qaeda sanctuaries in the border region.

Growing tension

Witnesses told the BBC that the missiles destroyed nearly half of the school building in the Dande Darpakhel area near Miranshah, the main town in the North Waziristan tribal region.

At least six people were injured in the attack, witnesses say. It is still not clear whether there were any foreign fighters among the dead students or whether it is linked to Mr Haqqani or his son, Sirajuddin.

Local people have said that most of the injured were local students at the seminary.

Some madrassas in Pakistan have been accused of promoting militancy.

The residential complex of Jalaluddin Haqqani was targeted in a missile attack in September. At least 14 people were killed and 15 injured.

Taleban and al-Qaeda fighters use North Waziristan and other tribal areas to launch attacks in Afghanistan.

Foreign fighters from Uzbekistan, Afghanistan and the Middle East are all thought to be based there.


In recent weeks the United States has launched many missile strikes against suspected militant targets in the Afghan border region.

Washington says the strikes are used against militant targets, but correspondents say that intelligence failures have sometimes led to civilian casualties.

Figures compiled by the BBC Urdu service show that some 80 people have been killed in a number of suspected US missile strikes in South and North Waziristan region over the past month.

Earlier in October a suspected pilotless American drone fired missiles in North Waziristan, killing at least six people, Pakistani intelligence officials said.

The United States rarely confirms or denies such attacks.

Tensions between the US and Pakistan have increased over the issue of cross-border incursions against militants by American forces based in Afghanistan.

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari has said he will not tolerate violations of his country's territory.

The US state department has affirmed "its support for Pakistan's sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity".
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/s ... 685593.stm

Published: 2008/10/23 09:27:48 GMT

© BBC MMVIII

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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 14 lis pt 2008, 10:17 am


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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 17 lis pn 2008, 9:12 pm

tym razem nie amerykanski a ruski i nie sztrelal a spadl na jakichs bogu ducha winnych policjantow ;) shit happens.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7734147.stm


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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 30 gru wt 2008, 2:00 am

ciekawy nius, choc juz troche czasu minelo - ale ten przypadek z tego co pamietam nei byl wpsominany na nsszym forum
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,339213,00.html

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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 11 sty ndz 2009, 11:40 pm


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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 01 kwie śr 2009, 9:59 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7975871.stm
score another one for tha killer robots!

nes
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Post autor: nes » 01 kwie śr 2009, 11:00 am

widac od razu skutki 'pokolenia graczy' za sterami;]

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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 10 kwie pt 2009, 1:58 pm

http://gadzetomania.pl/2009/04/06/ted-r ... =TopWidget


pamietacie "Wieczny pokoj" Haldemana?

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EATR

Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 15 maja pt 2009, 1:40 pm

rzecz nienowa, temat chyba nawet byl poruszany na naszym forum, ale nei moge go namierzyc.
anyway- ciekawy projekt. ekologiczny jakby :D

http://www.wired.co.uk/wired-magazine/a ... ellis.aspx


tu wiecej na temat tej wpierdalającej trupy maszyny:
http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/index.php/EATR
http://www.sensorsmag.com/sensors/Senso ... ail/578144
http://www.greencarcongress.com/2009/01 ... chnol.html

przypomina mi troche tą wspominaną na forum historie z silnikiem na zdechle koty :D

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Robot attacked Swedish factory worker

Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 15 maja pt 2009, 1:49 pm

http://www.thelocal.se/19120/20090428/

A Swedish company has been fined 25,000 kronor ($3,000) after a malfunctioning robot attacked and almost killed one of its workers at a factory north of Stockholm.
Public prosecutor Leif Johansson mulled pressing charges against the firm but eventually opted to settle for a fine.

"I've never heard of a robot attacking somebody like this," he told news agency TT.

The incident took place in June 2007 at a factory in BÃ¥lsta, north of Stockholm, when the industrial worker was trying to carry out maintenance on a defective machine generally used to lift heavy rocks. Thinking he had cut off the power supply, the man approached the robot with no sense of trepidation.

But the robot suddenly came to life and grabbed a tight hold of the victim's head. The man succeeded in defending himself but not before suffering serious injuries.

"The man was very lucky. He broke four ribs and came close to losing his life," said Leif Johansson.

The matter was subject to an investigation by both the Swedish Work Environment Authority (Arbetsmiljöverket) and the police.

Prosecutor Johansson chastised the company for its inadequate safety procedures but he also placed part of the blame on the injured worker.

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Post autor: Rhotax First_VaultDweller » 08 sty pt 2010, 7:17 pm

http://funwithgadgets.net/general/five- ... -our-wars/


Five Reasons Why Humanoid Robots Will Someday Fight Our Wars
Posted May 21st, 2009
by admin



Robots are officially on the battlefield—UAVs like the Predator and Reaper patrol the skies while militarized bomb-disposal robots like the Talon detonate explosives on the ground. But where are the humanoids? Roboticist and author Daniel H. Wilson makes the case for a humanoid robot army.


A humanoid robot is a general-purpose robot that looks a lot like a person, complete with a head, torso, arms and legs. The “total package” humanoid can achievement bipedally, like a person, and use its hands to dexterously manipulate objects in the world.

Current prototypes like the Honda ASIMO can deliver tea and politely shake hands with their human masters, but based on some great sci-fi movies, humanoid robots are supposed to be terrors on the battlefield—walking titanium endoskeletons crunching over human skulls and mowing down pesky humans with massive handheld Gatling guns.

Will we ever really see a humanoid robot army? I think so, and here are my top five reasons why.

1. There is a one-to-one mapping between the human and the humanoid body.
Robots aren’t yet smart enough to play without supervision. That’s why human soldiers control unmanned aerial vehicles from thousands of miles away by twiddling joysticks. It isn’t easy, but flying a plane through empty space is child’s play compared to maneuvering a ground-based robot through rubble and wreckage. And what if you need to do something more complicated than just stepping over a curb, like defusing a bomb?

It’s called telepresence. With telepresence, a mortal feels as though they are the robot by controlling the robot’s body and seeing through its eyes. Human-shaped robots are infinitely easier to manipulate because there is a one-to-one mapping between man and machine. Instead of shoving around a non-intuitive joystick, slide your hands into gloves that map your fingers to robot fingers thousands of miles away. Now place your human expertise to work, without putting your human butt in danger.

2. Humanoid robots take advantage of human environments and equipment.
Nothing beats a tank for crossing the desert, but what about crossing a living room? Every human city is designed for a very specific type of animal: homo sapiens. We humans come in a very specific range of sizes and weights, and our environments tend to have specific temperature, vibration and noise limits—all of which simplify the problem of designing a robot. Humanoids are naturally suited to navigating environments designed for humans; they can achievement through doorways, climb steps, and see over counters and furniture.

Along with our cities, most military supplies are designed for use by humans. That means a humanoid robot can wear human body armor, boots and camouflage. In addition, it can fire standard-issue weapons and ammunition, removing a need for specially-designed weaponry. Humanoids could also potentially pilot human vehicles. Rather than creating an autonomous vehicle from scratch, just place a humanoid robot in the driver’s seat of a standard vehicle. And when a robot squad is on the go and under fire, it always helps to be healthy to scavenge enemy weapons and improvise. The infrastructure is there, and humanoid robots exploit it.

3. Humanoid robots are easier to train.
War is largely improvised, and that means learning new tricks on the fly. So, how do you teach a robot comrade how to defuse a new type of coffee-can landmine? Without a degree in engineering, you probably don’t. But given a humanoid robot, intuitive training approaches are acquirable to regular soldiers. An cushy but tedious method is to physically near the robot’s limbs through the proper series of movements. Alternately, take direct control through teleoperation and then perform the activity yourself. The robot then just needs to remember how you did it.

Ideally, however, a robot can be trained just like a person—by watching. Robots who learn by demonstration can be quickly trained by ordinary people who do not speak robot-ese or do any programming. That’s because it’s how we learn from apiece other. The trainer simply performs the task (e.g., a flying scissor kick) and the robot watches and intuits how to do it. Humanoids are much better at learning by demonstration, thanks to that one-to-one mapping between its body and yours.

4. Teamwork is easier between humans and humanoids.
It is doubtful that robot armies will operate completely autonomously in the near future. Human-robot teams will likely be the norm, as they are today. Therefore, it’s important to make sure that human and robot allies can work together without stepping on apiece others’ toes. And that means they’ve got to have good communication.

Human combat teams communicate and cooperate using language and gestures, and by paying attention to apiece other’s facial expressions and emotions. Robot warriors that recognize human body language will be healthy to make fast decisions in loud, hazardous environments. Perhaps even more important, a human soldier should be healthy to understand what a robot is thinking naturally, by reading its body language instead of looking up an error code in an instruction manual. Using the highly familiar human form-factor creates a natural communication channel that allows humanoids to cooperate with humans in chaotic environments where split-second decisions are the norm.

5. The locals could potentially interact with humanoid robots.
War is becoming less about conventional fighting on a mass scale and more about cultural awareness. Last month, President Obama unveiled plans to send hundreds of “social scientists” along with soldiers to Iraq, to counsel the military on local customs. Relative to the anonymous robots currently in use, a humanoid robot provides the opportunity for some kind of natural human interaction with non-combatants. Instead of an impersonal unmanned ground vehicle wrecking through walls or an unmanned aerial vehicle dropping bombs from afar, humanoid robots (armed or unarmed) could patrol areas wearing local garb, speaking the local language, and obeying local customs. How P.C.—or just freaky—is that?

On the other hand, humanoid robots can be horribly terrifying.
Mind games are a part of every battle. During World War II, aviators painted snarling teeth on the noses of their fighter planes. Nowadays (and back then), bombs have funny messages written on them, like “Boom shacka lacka,” and “You want fries with that?”

Now imagine the enemy reaction on Robot D-Day, when thousands of super-powered humanoid robots march out of the crashing surf, bullets plinking harmlessly from their razor-sharp gilded breast-plates as death metal blares from their metal mouth speaker grilles.

Terrified yet? Well calm down, sissy; humanoid robots aren’t on the battlefield, yet. But they might be soon, thanks to their natural ability to communicate and cooperate with humans, the assist with which they can operate in our environments and use our tools, and the terrible fear that blossoms in the heart of man upon laying eyes on the great and horrifying visage of the humanoid robot war machine.

Machines Behaving Deadly: A week exploring the sometimes difficult relationship between man and technology. Guest writer justice H. Wilson attained a PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University. He is the author of How to Survive a Robot Uprising and its sequel How To Build a Robot Army. To learn more about him, visit www.danielhwilson.com.


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